Interview with Debra Webb
QUESTION 1
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Um, t--tell me, tell me about the Panthers in the late '60s where you grew up in Chicago. What did you think about them and what they were doing?

DEBRA WEBB:

Well, the way I think of them, they were.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

No, frame your answers, "The way I think of the Panthers--"

DEBRA WEBB:

The way I think of the Panthers were--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Start again. No problem.

DEBRA WEBB:

I got scared. The way I thought of the Panthers were, the things that they had did for the people, ah, as far as the feeding, the hunger of the children in the area. I was raised in Henry Horner Projects and I attended Cr--Crane and McKinley School, so I got a chance to see them. Because I would come down to Western and Madison and right at Madison and Western there was a Vienna hot dog stand and they lived, they're, well their center was next door. So you have to go up stairs. So, I, many times I want to be quisitive[SIC], go up there and see what they were doing, which I did, which I wasn't supposed to be over there but I was there and I thought the things that they were doing was really marvelous because it was just like, which would we need today, people feeding someone. I felt like it was a great deal because they had it there, where children shouldn't have been hungry. I know a lot of mothers didn't want to feed the child so they sent them to school hungry. But, here was a place that fed them. You could go there anytime to eat. I imagine even with the bums later in the evening, they went up there but, how did I know? I don't know, but I'm just saying maybe that was on too.