Interview with Kevin White
QUESTION 9
JACKIE SHEARER:

And how do you feel about being the man in the middle?

KEVIN WHITE:

Ahh, as I said, self-sympathetic, on more, on more than one occasion. Ah, little dramatic to say, "Oh why, why me, O Lord?" But the fact of the matter is that I had wrestled with it, I had fought Mrs. Hicks over this. Even my personality had been subordinated when I ran for mayor. I was called the opposition candidate to Mrs. Hicks. Ah, I was seen as bland. Ah, I, uh, resented both of those, uh, pictures of me. Ah, now I've forgotten your question as I get off on a tangent.

JACKIE SHEARER:

How you felt about being the man in the middle.

KEVIN WHITE:

Well, one is self-sympathetic. Ah, but, but, uh, there's an exhilaration of emotion that goes along with wrestling with a public question like that. In fact, you get so emotionally involved yourself, as you go to bed every night and get up every morning, ah, on this, and, and you had a sense, as did the city in a corporate, uh, sense, that this was building to a head. It wasn't something that was flattening out. It, and, and, so that pulled away from any real self-sympathy. I was too engaged, uh, there would be times, after busing, when, uh, uh, I would, uh, you know, as a man it sounds ridi--but I would cry. I, I went away--not often, I didn't do it often--but boy, I, I left the city, I'm jumping ahead, but in October, I just left. Ah, you can absorb so much of other people's emotions, and that was something, to, to be effective as a politician, you have to, as they say, feel, but feel is another way of texture of absorbing, and if it comes in such strong, potent forces, then, then, uh, it sometimes can be emotionally, and I'm very healthy mentally, that someone can take, or that becomes a worry, a worry.