Interview with Kevin White
QUESTION 14
JACKIE SHEARER:

When you did hear the results, did you think it meant anything?

KEVIN WHITE:

Not of great political import in the town, as such. But if you put it in retrospect, it meant the way it was over, that, not gone, it didn't disappear, but the boil had broken. That we're on a road to recovery, that, as I say, from 1974 to 1977, enormous changes had occurred, some we didn't even see, and for the main participants, Black and White, things were never going to be the same again. And, and Mrs. Hicks was about to disappear as a strong political force in Boston. But for the first time, a native-born Black was about to assume a position of important. But that didn't say that John O'Brian would change Boston politics, or that we would never again have an issue that Mrs. Hicks represented, that cut to the core of our emotional feelings, but it meant that that fight, that part of Boston's history that reflected its--