Interview with Robert Williams
QUESTION 5
INTERVIEWER:

WELL, WHAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED THAT NIGHT? AT ALBERT PERRY'S HOUSE?

Robert Williams:

Well, actually the Klan came through and they made a foray, and there were some exchange of shots, but just lightly, but actually the biggest thing came after that. In fact, and after they had been parading through the black community and firing pistols and shot guns from car windows to intimidate blacks, a group of black ministers went up and asked the city and county officials to ban the Klan motorcades from our community. And uh, the officials refused to do this on the grounds that the Klan had the same constitutional right to organize as our National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. So we asked the preachers to please not to go back and to beg those people anymore, from that time forward we would patrol our communities and that we would uh, drive the Klan out. They need not ask them anymore. And it so happened that uh, in some weeks after that, that we had, did have uh, some shoot-out with the Klan, and drove 'em out. And uh, strangely enough and then all of the little fishes were willing to take away their constitutional rights. In fact they banned them from the community, then that they couldn't have any more motorcades in the black community, but this was not done out of deference to us, or for the protection of our community, but to protect the lives of the Klan.