Interview with Albert Wilson
QUESTION 1
JUDY RICHARDSON:

OK, going back to the mid 1960s, just before then, what, how did police treat young Blacks at that time?

ALBERT WILSON:

Well, at that time, young Blacks were treated with discipline. They discipline--the poli--the police department disciplined, used more discipline and force--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

No, it's OK.

ALBERT WILSON:

--than I've seen in quite a long time. At that time, we had what we call the Big Four, the stretch units, and they were made to, they were made to be visible there, to be noticed at all times, their presence was very, very noticeable, and for Blacks, this was, it was like a threat. It was like mother and father being there at all times, and that's why, that's kind of the way I looked at, at the police department then, as big brother, mother, father--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Cut.

ALBERT WILSON:

Cut, because I'm rambling.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

No, it's not you, it's the




JUDY RICHARDSON:

Going back to 1967, what was it like for young Blacks in terms of the way the police treated you?

ALBERT WILSON:

Well, we were treated--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Sorry. If you could say, the police.

ALBERT WILSON:

The police treated us, they treated us fairly. They weren't, they weren't hard but they were very strict. They enforced the law very forcefully. I mean, we were made to, we knew what to do. We knew when we were wrong and when they, we saw them, we straightened up our act.