Interview with Albert Wilson
QUESTION 7
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Can you say that again and just give me a sense of why he was attacked with the bayonet?

ALBERT WILSON:

Yeah.

ALBERT WILSON:

OK. My neighbor was attacked, due to the fact that he, I don't think he really realized--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Say, my neighbor was attacked by--I'm sorry.

ALBERT WILSON:

By one of our, one of the--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Sorry. Let me--Be quiet and then, I saw my neighbor--

ALBERT WILSON:

I saw my neighbor.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Yeah, fine.

ALBERT WILSON:

I saw my neighbor being stabbed by one of the law enforcement teams that I believe it was the state troopers because he had come home that morning with a hangover. He had been out to a party, which he did on the week-ends. I don't think he knew what was going on. What had, what had happened, he was one of the people who didn't know this had happened. There were quite a few people who got up and didn't know that this was going on. It just so happened that we got up early on Sunday mornings to go play. But the, the playground was in our front yard this time.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Can you say one more time that you saw your neighbor being bayoneted and give me what happened?

ALBERT WILSON:

OK. I, I saw my neighbor being stabbed with a bayonet by a state trooper after he was asked to go on his porch. He was only five or ten feet from his porch, but he was asked to get off the street in front of his house, city sidewalk, and to go on to his own property. And, ah he refused. And at this point he was warned and forewarned and he was stabbed with a bayonet. He fell to the ground. I'm not sure if he died. I do remember it took hours for an ambulance to get there to pick him up. But I do remember my mother going in to call an ambulance. I do remember the other neighbors bringing the blankets out for him and, ah, I'm not quite sure if the gentleman died or not.