Interview with Anne Wild
QUESTION 8
LOUIS MASSIAH:

Who were you in 1967-68? I mean, what did you see, where was your life taking you, what did you see yourself doing?

ANNE WILD:

Well, I'd been a militant sort of activist in the, uh, anti-war movement from the beginning. We organized this Vietnam Day committee. A lot of people who had been then active, actually part of that in the Civil Rights Movement, in CORE and SNCC, Friends of SNCC, and we, '67 actually was sort of a serious year. I, and a lot of other women in this area, organized a women's liberation group, the first in the East Bay. And so we were fighting, and a lot of what we, a lot of our political theory and ideas and sense of, uh, identity are fighting against men in terms of a sexual oppression we felt was borrowed from the Civil Rights Movement. Was borrowed from the oppression of the Black people that we'd known and experienced in Frantz Fanon, and a lot of the writers. You know, we made that analogy between us as women, and how Blacks, uh, are oppressed by basically this White supremacist society. So, we borrowed a lot from the Black movement in terms of our own struggle. So also that year, that was the year where we had "Stop the Draft" week, where we organized a "Stop the Draft". Which was a series of demonstrations in Oakland where there were a lot of arrests.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Okay, let's stop it for one second.

ANNE WILD:

Yea, I got really dry here.