Interview with Geraldine Williams
QUESTION 2
LOUIS MASSIAH:

Okay, but what in terms of the mood of the community, the mood of Cleveland, what would suggest that a Black man could get elected? I mean, because in a lot of other cities it was difficult to elect a Black person.

GERALDINE WILLIAMS:

Well, in the first place, we had to find a politician that had appealed to--well, we had had Black people uh, elected in Cleveland. Not for, not for the city office, but for state offices, state legislature, state senate. So why couldn't we elect a, uh, and we had Black councilmen. There were plenty of Black councilmen. There were about nine or ten Black councilmen at that particular time.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Right.

GERALDINE WILLIAMS:

So--

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Could you say that once again, there was a little bit of noise outside.

GERALDINE WILLIAMS:

Oh. Ah, we had Black councilmen, about nine or ten Black councilmen. So if there were enough Black voters uh, to put these councilmen in these wards we could almost depend on those wards to go for a Black mayor. At least we thought we could.