Interview with Geraldine Williams
QUESTION 3
LOUIS MASSIAH:

We're in '67 now. What did you think a Black mayor could do in Cleveland that a White mayor couldn't, couldn't do? Why was it important to, to elect a Black mayor?

GERALDINE WILLIAMS:

Well, we thought we'd get a fair shake when it came to police relations and, uh, maybe housing and, uh--

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Let's stop. We have to change--



LOUIS MASSIAH:

Let's cut.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Cut. Is that going to bother--



LOUIS MASSIAH:

Okay. What did you think a Black mayor could do? We're in 1967. What did you think a Black mayor could do? Why was it important in Cleveland to elect a Black mayor?

GERALDINE WILLIAMS:

Well, we thought a Black mayor could do as well as some of the White mayors had done. And we certainly thought it would be an improvement in police/citizen relations because at that time they weren't too good. And we thought maybe he could do something about housing. We thought he would have the interests of the Blacks more at heart which the White mayors didn't seem to have particularly**.