Interview with Roger Wilkins
QUESTION 13
INTERVIEWER:

We're you surprised, as if you hadn't answered that first question, we're you surprised when the movement didn't accomplish anything in Chicago?

ROGER WILKINS:

No, I wasn't surprised. Ah, non-violent confrontation could attack variou--

INTERVIEWER:

I'm sorry, I need you to answer in a full sentence: We're you surprised when the non-violent movement seemed to have left Chicago without much of a victory?

ROGER WILKINS:

I wasn't surprised when the non-violent movement left Chicago without much of a victory, because non-violent confrontation could solve sharp, crisp evils like segregation. But when you had general cultural, social, racial bigotry, which required repairing of human beings and repairing of systems like school systems, like police systems, you couldn't do that with just a brief confrontation. You're dealing with problems that weren't just multi-decade problems, they were multi-generational problems. Daley was a bigot, his whole system was bigoted. The culture of the city was bigoted. Ah, a brief non-violent campaign could not change that.

INTERVIEWER:

Great, stop. OK, what else?