Interview with Roger Wilkins
QUESTION 16
INTERVIEWER:

Can you stop for a second. Now I want to ask you the second part of that question which is, um--



ROGER WILKINS:

After the President--

INTERVIEWER:

Sorry, can you start again, so you're not scratching?

ROGER WILKINS:

After the President decided not to provide free food stamps for people who made less than $30 a month, I figured that our political system had had it, at least for that cycle. I surely had had it. I'd spent all of my energy and all my emotion. Um, but I thought, "It's time to get out of this government, because if changes are going to made, they have to be made from energy generated from outside the government." This government no longer had the energy to respond to people's needs. And I was exhausted, I was depleted, and I was profoundly depressed because we'd started the '60s with high hopes. Ah, I had identified with all the yearnings of the poor, the women, the Black, the Hispanic, the left out. And sitting there inside the government I knew, to a moral, to a moral certainty at that point that the government had no more answers, at least at that time, to these problems. It was, had no imagination for them. It had no energy for them. Ah, it just wanted to get on with the war.

INTERVIEWER:

OK, stop.