Interview with Judge John Minor Wisdom
QUESTION 17
INTERVIEWER:

YOU DON'T THINK, FOR EXAMPLE AND THIS IS NOT EVEN, ONLY LEGALLY, BUT IN TERMS OF THE POPULATION THAT THERE WAS EVER A POPULAR FEELING SO STRONG FOR INTERPOSITION THAT THE FEDERATED SYSTEM WAS UNDER THREAT?

Judge John Minor Wisdom:

Well, I think that if the question is whether their the doctrine of interposition was ever serious enough, taken seriously enough, by say the people of Mississippi for it to be threat to the union. My answer to that is no, because I think that the leaders in the community knew that there was no legal basis for the doctrine, and it couldn't get anywhere in the courts. And you cannot get anywhere with, in the, in considering the relationship of the state to the nation, unless you have the stamp of approval by the courts. This I'm finally convinced of, and I think the supreme court made that clear.

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM:

Okay, that was a camera roll out. Okay we're going to camera roll 131. Okay, we're going to camera roll 131, 131. Speed.