Interview with Harris Wofford
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT ABOUT SOMETHING LIKE THE MISSILE GAP? WOULD THAT BE SOMETHING—

Harris Wofford:

The missile gap was part of his foreign policy, ah, position. He… he moved further than I like to hear in taking up Cuba as a threat and a challenge to the United States. He even… mmm, talked a lot about Cuba, Ghana, and Guinea as threats to us. Ah, he also talked about a new relationship with the Soviet Union. He had kind of a foreign policy position in the campaign. One edge that was very tough in talking about closing the missile gap and strengthening our defenses, and the other was the… moving out of the Cold War into a…into a new relationship with the Third World and… and… and with the Soviet Union too. But that double-edged foreign policy sword was the… the one that Kennedy liked to weild best. It was, you know, he wrote a book when he was ah, 19 years old, ah, warning about the… the coming of Hitler, and ah, the unpreparedness of England. And foreign policy was always, I think, the fire in his belly that was… that was most ah, ah, genuine and that was there first.