Interview with Sonny Wright
QUESTION 5
INTERVIEWER:

Why after thirty years? What, to what do you attribute the Cuban great success after thirty years?

SONNY WRIGHT:

Well, I don't know if it's thirty years or, or maybe if it's longer. I think that, like most people that look at what the Cubans have accomplished and have some idea of their background, you have to recognize that initially a lot of the Cubans that came here came with money. They came with education. They came with skills. They came away from a government that they didn't want to be subject to. So they came seeking political freedom and freedom of speech, and all the things that America represents. And they came and they brought something with them. They brought their skills. They brought their, their wealth in a lot of instances. But there were many of them that did not have, maybe, great skills or great amounts of wealth. But what they've done is they've done what the Black people need to do. That is stick together, work together, pool their resources, do the things that make the difference. And what the difference is is that when people understand that their destinies really are interwoven, I mean, and, and recognize that the, the real value of relationships and, and of, and of opportunities for that matter is in seeing that people around you that you are friendly with, that you have some influence with reach the heights. Because if my friend is in a position and he has control and he has power, then at least I have an opportunity, whether he gives it to me or not, it's there for him to give it to somebody. So we need to recognize, in my opinion at least, anyway, that the idea is to not pull the other man, but push and try to see if you can't, as you make your stride to reach your goal, to do what your destiny calls for you to do, push somebody, in this case we're talking about a somebody Black, in order that he might be able to reach back and pull somebody. And together we pool our resources. We learn to buy from our own community. We learn to respect one another. We learn to control our neighborhoods. And we learn to do all the things that other people have already demonstrated to us that work. Not only the Cubans, what about the Jewish people? Well, when the Jewish people came here, at least when I came here, they were saying there were signs on the beach. I never saw any of the signs. But they must have been there because I read about it, I heard about it. There were signs on Miami Beach which said that no Jews, no dogs allowed. That had to be very, I mean, you know, hurtful to a Jewish person to see a sign like that. It's something like you know, White water fountain, Black water fountain, sit at the back of the bus, same kind of thing. But today, the Jews own Miami Beach. That's what it's all about, man. I mean, now if you go to Miami Beach and you want to do something you have to deal with them because they understand the value of working together.

INTERVIEWER:

Stop there.

SONNY WRIGHT:

That's what it's all about.