Interview with Sonny Wright
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

Tell me what it was like trying to buy a hamburger when you got here thirty years ago.

SONNY WRIGHT:

Oh, you remember that story I told you, huh?

INTERVIEWER:

Mm hm.

SONNY WRIGHT:

Yeah. I, when I first came here, I recall going into, Royal Castle. Royal Castle's like a Burger King or a McDonald's of, of today. And, I made the mistake of sitting down waiting for a hamburger that I was going to take out because I knew that you couldn't eat the hamburger there, but I felt like you know, since I had an opportunity to sit down and wait for the hamburger it wouldn't be a problem doing that. And I sat down. And I was told by the clerk that I had to get up. And of course I was very embarrassed because the place is you know, full of people. And I explained that you know, I was just waiting for the hamburger. And he explained to me that I couldn't sit down and wait for it. I had to stand up and wait for it. And when I got it I had to leave with it. And that was really a, a, an experience that I think a lot of Black people have, you know, had at one time in their life in way or another. But as we discussed earlier, I think that the idea really is not so much the ability to eat at a hamburger place, but I think more importantly, to buy one. And I think that's what it's all about. And I think that that's where Black America has to go. It has, we have to try to see if we can't control these resources in the community and keep our dollars circulating among ourselves more than one time because that's what the whole thing's all about, to be able to create opportunity for our business people and to create jobs for our young people and our pop--our general, our population in general. Not to mention the other people that we would employ. We have to begin to, to use our resources in a way in which it benefits us more than what it presently does today.

INTERVIEWER:

Stop down


SONNY WRIGHT:

That's what it is, man.

INTERVIEWER:

I know, I understand, I understand.