Interview with Senator Ralph Yarborough
QUESTION 18
INTERVIEWER:

LET ME JUST START YOU OVER AGAIN, UH, BECAUSE I THINK YOU OVERLAPPED ME A LITTLE BIT. WOULD YOU JUST GIVE ME A STATEMENT ON THAT?

Senator Ralph Yarborough:

Well, by 1965 there had been uh so many, such a long fight over civil rights with the uh Montgomery bus issue and the Selma riots and the Birmingham riots and all that, that uh, that I think the people were tired of it. Now that doesn't mean that they'd changed their opinions on it. But they were tired of the long hassle over it and uh, I think that many people would like to see it settled. After all John Adams you know, said after the American Revolution, at the time of the revolution, a third of the people were for it, a third were against it and a third didn't want to get involved. Well, it might been that way with civil rights in Texas. A number of people just didn't want to argue that, they had something else they wanted the Congress to do that was more important to them than that issue. And uh, the issue was not as hot in Texas as it was in the other southern states because the percentage of blacks was much lower in Texas. And uh, there were only about four counties in Texas where the blacks were in the majority, where the issue was keenest and the people, the most bitter, was where the races were about equally divided.