Interview with Paul N. Ylvisaker
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

I guess what I'm looking for is, is, the people who were often times arrested were people of some substance. They had jobs, they were not, not the people without hope.

PAUL YLVISAKER:

I would like to look at the pattern of arrests. I mean, you, you understand quickly that the people who get arrested in protests and so forth usually are ed--better educated, have better economic circumstance, they tend to be the leadership of the community. On the other hand, when you take a look at who threw the brick and stole the television set, who created the violence in the first place, it's doubtful that those same people will show up in the pattern. I know in Newark that the leading Black, the head of CORE, tried to stop the violence and almost got killed in the process.



PAUL YLVISAKER:

It's fascinating to see what happened after the violence occurred in any one of these places, but I'll take Newark as an example. If it hadn't been for the violence, you would not have had a willingness to negotiate. The governor needed that kind of a precipitating event to say, "I will now talk with the Black community of Newark about its, its needs and its feelings of exclusion." And that was a signal event that happened. We then sat down in protracted negotiations with a Black negotiating team and the state officials on how we would resolve many of the things that had come up during that, that riot. The governor then, along with other politicians around the country in that period of fear and apprehension, the governor put into the legislature, I think it was--