Interview with Rev. Andrew Young
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

ASIDE FROM THE SPECIFICS THAT YOU'VE MENTIONED HERE, THERE WAS A FOUR-POINT PLAN THAT WE READ ABOUT, MUCH MORE GENERAL, NONVIOLENT MARCHES IN THE STREET, PART ONE, GET THE RACISTS TO RETALIATE, GET THE OUTRAGE OF THE AMERICANS, AND MAKE THAT OUTRAGE MATERIALIZE IN LEGISLATION. WHAT ABOUT THAT?

Rev. Andrew Young:

Well, I doubt that we ever spelled it out that way, because we never wanted racists to retaliate. That was probably not an SCLC plan. What we did say was that we would put so many people in jail that we would bring the system to a halt, and that our emphasis was on noncooperation and economic withdrawal, and that that would be the thing that would bring about a change legislatively. We saw this, we saw the marches as a means of bringing about economic boycotts, and that the, the pattern that we had developed in Birmingham, which essentially stopped the black community and white people of good will from buying anything except food and medicine, for a period of about ninety days, was basically a workable plan in any community. And that you didn't have to completely close down the businesses. The profit margin in most businesses is ten or fifteen percent, and if you take the black community and the Black Belt out, you could cut the profit by fifty percent. You could stop business in almost any city in America with an organized effort and daily demonstrations, and that was basically what our strategy was.