Interview with Rev. Andrew Young
CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

I'M SORRY, I MISSED THAT. I NEED YOU TO HAVE THAT ONE LAST SENTENCE OVER AGAIN. "FOR US TO MARCH WOULD HAVE BEEN IN VIOLATION OF THE INJUNCTION."

Rev. Andrew Young:

For… for us to march we would have been in violation of a federal court order from a judge that had always been fair with us. And so we were in the delicate position of having people who had come down wanting to march, ah, but for them to march would have meant that we would have turned the movement around. And so we basically worked out a compromise. Since the police—the troopers—weren't going to let us march anyway, ah, we worked out a compromise that we would go up to the march and have our prayers, and to the place where people were beaten, ah, and then turn around and come back. Ah, there were some people who wanted to insist on another confrontation, and I think probably if it had not been the fact that this was a federal judge—Martin made a deliberate distinction between federal judges and state court judges—he said that from 1954, the only ally we've had has been the federal courts. And we have to respect the federal courts, even when we disagree with them, ah, and so he just refused to violate any federal court order. Some of the students wanted to violate a federal court order—

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

I'M SORRY. WE'VE JUST RUN OUT. IT'S ALL YOURS, CALLIE.