Interview with Rev. Andrew Young
QUESTION 37
INTERVIEWER:

THE FINAL MARCH… IT'S BEEN APPROVED NOW, YOU'RE ON THE ROAD, DESCRIBE THAT FEELING, THOSE PEOPLE, THOSE MOMENTS, WHAT THAT WAS LIKE, AFTER ALL OF THAT?

Rev. Andrew Young:

Well, um, the march from Selma to Montgomery, from my perspective, you know, was a job. We had 300 people to feed everyday, and we had to find a place to pitch tents, ah, and we had to be concerned about security, ah, all along the road. And ah, it was, I mean there was absolutely nothing romantic about it. It was anywhere from, I think the shortest march day was ten miles, and I was running back and forth mostly with Ivanhoe Donaldson of SNCC, trying to keep the march together and solving problems from one end to the other. And so I figure anytime they marched ten miles, I did closer to forty. And so, you know, some days we did ten, twelve miles, some days we did as many as eighteen miles, ah, and so it was really work. Ah, and it ah, and yet it was enjoyable. There was no apparent tension, ah, the fact that we had to cover a certain amount of mileage, the fact that we had to provide food, ah, the fact that we had to find a place to stay and pitch the tents. And also that the fact that there was a group of ministers from this group that had turned around, who stayed, and who basically provided—they were sort of the quartermaster core—they provided the… the services. They took care of the tents. Ah, they arranged to move the blankets from place to place, and ah, but it was a tremendous logistical operation.