Interview with Rev. Andrew Young
QUESTION 54
INTERVIEWER:

WYATT T. WALKER, DEMEANOR, WE READ, ADDED TO THAT TENSION. NOT SO MUCH THE SPECIFICS OF YOU KNOW, PREACHER TALKING TO STUDENT, BUT HIS DEMEANOR, IS THAT TRUE? ABOUT A MINUTE LEFT ON THE ROLL.

Rev. Andrew Young:

Well, Wyatt… Wyatt, I think was, always believed even in SCLC with us, I mean Wyatt was a hard-nosed administrator. He felt that the movement was most vulnerable. And this is true, that most black movements have been vulnerable to the charge of financial misappropriation. And that the way the FBI and everybody else sought to undercut the movement—

[unintelligible background conversation]

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM:

TONE [unintelligible background conversation] TONE 13.

Rev. Andrew Young:

Well, when Martin left Albany he was ah, very depressed. Ah, but we went away—

[unintelligible background conversation]

Rev. Andrew Young:

Martin left Albany he was very depressed. but ah, he knew what had happened. Ah, and he really felt that a… again it was a federal judge ah, that called Oi off that movement. Ah, he had a very, you know, emotional exchange with Burke Marshall over that, because he felt that though the Kennedy Administration had helped to in Alban. But when we went to Birmingham, ah, by th e he ah, knew that non-violence was on trial. That it had not failed because we had been pulled into an unplanned movement, and that now we had to plan a movement, we had to take on segregation, ah, and he was very optimistic. And though, very serious… I mean he knew the dangers and knew the difficulties, but ah, he knew he had to go ahead. I say that Birmingham was the first time that Martin Luther King deliberately and consciously assumed leadership. Every other time he was pushed into it by forces that were beyond his control. But he decided to go to Birmingham and he decided to go to jail. He wrote the letter from the Birmingham jail in jail. Ah, and it was a deliberate act of will on his part, ah that gave him the leadership of the movement.