Interview with Rev. Andrew Young
QUESTION 8
INTERVIEWER:

YOU MENTIONED SNCC, THEIR INVOLVEMENT IN 1963 HAVING LAID THE FOUNDATION, THEY'VE BEEN IN SELMA BEFORE, HERE COMES SCLC. WHAT WAS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCLC AND SNCC AT THAT POINT?

Rev. Andrew Young:

Well, it was sort of like me and my younger brother. We loved each other, but we fought all the time. And I think that it sort of depended on who it was with SNCC. With John Lewis and Ivanhoe Donaldson, we basically functioned as we were one staff. Sometimes with Jim Foreman, and Stokely, there were little tensions. It depended on whether or not the SNCC persons involved resented Martin Luther King's prominence. Some of them did, some of them didn't. But I had been involved in Selma training; in fact Mrs. Boynton had come to one of our workshops, as early as 1962. And we had been training people throughout that region, since 1961. So that it was—we didn't see it, and I was in charge of the training—but we never asked people whether they were SCLC people or SNCC people or NAACP people. We just brought people together. In fact the way we tried to identify leaders, was, we said, we wanted the kind of people who had Ph.D. minds who never had an opportunity to get the formal training that enabled them to have an impact on the society that they ought to have had, because of their intelligence and natural leadership ability. And in going through the community, Mrs. Boynton was clearly one of those that we identified. And she became sort of the leader, and supervisor, of all of our work, working through the Dallas County Voters' League, I think.