Interview with Andrew Young
QUESTION 22
PAUL STECKLER:

And you got the injunction thrown out?

ANDREW YOUNG:

We got the injunction thrown out, and we got our permission to march, and I guess about 4:30 or 5:00, I came back to the Lorraine Motel and I found Martin and A.D., and Ralph, and everybody gathered there, and they'd been eating, and, and had lunch, and were talking and clowning, and when I came in, Martin just grabbed me and threw me down on the bed, and started beating me with a pillow. I mean, he was, he was like a big kid. He was fussing because I hadn't reported to him, and I tried to tell him, "I was on the witness stand, I'm here in the Federal Court." And he was just standing on the bed swinging the pillow at me. I'm trying to duck with him saying, "You have to let me know what's going on." You know, and finally I snatched the pillow and started swinging back and it, you know, and everybody, it was sort of like the, the, you know, touchdown, and everybody piles on everybody. It wa--it was just, I mean, people just started throwing pillows and piling on top of everybody, and laughing and, and going on and then, he stopped and, and said, "Let's go." You know we'd do a dinner at six, it was at that time about six o'clock. And he went on up to his room to, you know, to put on a shirt and tie. I went out in the court yard, waiting for him and started shadow-boxing with James Orange who is about, you know, 6'5" and 280 pounds, so it was mostly continuing the clowning around atmosphere. I mean James could slap me in the ground with his little finger, but I was, you know, clowning around with him. And Martin came out and asked "You think I need a coat?" and we said, "Yeah, it's pretty cool, and you've had a cold, you better go back and get a coat." And he said, "I don't know weather or not I need coat," and you know, the next thing we know, a shot. Well I thought it was a car backfiring, or a firecracker, and I looked up and didn't see him.** And I frankly thought that it was a car that backfired and he was still clowning, because he was always given to clowning particularly in those kinds of--when we'd been very, very well down, and then all of a sudden, you know things look like they're going to work out, he could get very giddy almost. But then I ran up and saw that--

PAUL STECKLER:

do we have--