Interview with Andrew Young
QUESTION 23
PAUL STECKLER:

Resurrection City, did it ever stand a chance? What went wrong with it?

ANDREW YOUNG:

Well, Resurrection City was designed to house 1,500 well-trained, well-disciplined demonstrators who were actually coming to Washington to organize the Black community in Washington. And Martin was killed, and instead of 1,500 over a period of time, we probably had close to 15,000. At any given day there were six or seven thousand people trying to live in a city that was being built for 1500. Also the--

PAUL STECKLER:

Cut.





PAUL STECKLER:

Resurrection City. What went wrong with it?

ANDREW YOUNG:

Resurrection City was a community that was designed for 1,500 and many, many more people showed up. There were 1,500 well-trained, well-disciplined demonstrators that were going to be recruited from around the country. And in the middle of this process Martin Luther King was killed. So that set us back, both in training and in building of Resurrection City and everybody wanted to be a part of the Poor People's Campaign after Martin's death. The funeral was the same way. We would have thought that 10-15,000 people coming to Martin's funeral would have been all we could handle; there were probably closer to 100,000 people. And, yet we made it. But Resurrection City was not just more people than we could house or handle. There were people in Resurrection City who were placed there, I think, to disrupt and create discontent. And so we were constantly fighting a battle both inside and outside.