Interview with Clay East
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QUESTION 35
INTERVIEWER:

That's good, that's good. Now, let me ask you, is there anything else that you can think of that you just want to tell me? Anything else you want to say? About the STFU, about you, about anything? And we can stop if you need to think about it for a minute.

CLAY EAST:

Well, stop.

INTERVIEWER:

OK, we'll stop.

[cut][slate marker visible on screen]
INTERVIEWER:

Go ahead, Mr. East.

CLAY EAST:

About, what was the question on that?

INTERVIEWER:

The question was, that you could say, if you had anything else you wanted to tell me, if you had anything else you wanted to say, about yourself, about the union, anything.

CLAY EAST:

Well, in the first place, I never went into this to make a name for Mitch or make it my business or anything, which Mitch did. So, after I  [ gap: ;reason: unintelligible ]  getting out, I still faced two mobs in there, for the simple reason Mitch sent me, instead of going himself. One was at Forest City, Arkansas, and the other was at Marked Tree, Arkansas, and that is another thing I'd like to bring out. Mitch says that that charter was the only charter ever issued to the Socialist Party, or when they come to me in Marked Tree, trying to get me not to take that woman down there to talk, said, "There's going to be bloodshed." I told them then, then, "Look, if there's going to be bloodshed, it's going to be done by the other side, because we got no intention of shedding any blood." But they brought her down. Dr. Philips, who was a veterinarian, and Sean Burgen[?] Bloom, begged me not to have that meeting, and they was old socialists. So, at some time in the future, Arkansas'd have a Socialist Party. Of course, Mitch says that's the only time they ever had a charter, which had to be wrong, because, those—

INTERVIEWER:

Let me ask you, do you consider Mitch a friend, was he a friend?

CLAY EAST:

Well, Mitch used other people. Me, and anyone that he could, he used other people all the time... naturally, he called me his friend, and so forth, and when he come to my house he made himself at home. He'd come in and spend maybe two or three days, I'd haul him around—

[camera cuts out, audio continues]
CLAY EAST:

—he never did pay for anything. I'd go to some town where he was, and he never invited me to his home, he'd tell me where I could get a cabin or something. So, that was another case of him using me. 'Course, he always called me his friend, which I guess he should have, because I backed him all the time, and like his brother said, and like he said, I backed him when I thought he was wrong, which I did.

INTERVIEWER:

We just ran out film. Thank you.