Interview with Raymond Haight
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QUESTION 11
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RAYMOND HAIGHT:

My dad believed that he could sneak in, and win the election, because he believed—

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RAYMOND HAIGHT:

My father, Raymond Haight, believed that he could win [coughs] the election. When Upton Sinclair was attacked by the newspapers and the radio, he was convinced that they would smear him, and when that happened, he felt that eventually the polls would show that Sinclair would begin to go down. At that point, my Dad felt that he could go to Sinclair, and say, we both have said we want to defeat Merriam, will you withdraw and support me? We will make sure that he is defeated, and we will work together to change things in California.

INTERVIEWER:

OK, great, I want you to tell it to me again, but just, let's just do it one more time.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

Right, right, and I'll improvise. My dad, Raymond Haight, was convinced that he could win. His plan was to, to wait in the wings, continuing to get recognition, to go throughout the state. He had a little radio mic that he took around, and he would speak on street corners and tie up traffic, because this was rather a phenomenon in '34, and he felt that he would get name recognition. Then, when Upton Sinclair would be thoroughly attacked by the press, the radio, called a Communist, a pinko, left-winger, a radical, going to bring Russia into California, that Sinclair's popularity would plummet, and when it went down, that would be his chance. Because they both wanted Merriam out, he would go to Sinclair and say, now that you're going down in the polls, will you withdraw and support me, so we can beat Merriam?