Interview with Raymond Haight
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QUESTION 12
INTERVIEWER:

OK, tell me what you know about the meeting that they had, on precisely that issue.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

The meeting took place, the meeting between my father and Upton Sinclair took place in Sacramento. They met for about an hour. It was apparently a very cordial meeting, and when the meeting was over, Sinclair said that he would consider withdrawing, and that he would get back to him. Within 24 hours the press picked up on the meeting, and they called my dad and said that Sinclair had made a statement, what did he want to say? My father made a statement. They had tricked my dad, then they called Sinclair—

INTERVIEWER:

I'm going to actually ask you to stop.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

Right. OK.

INTERVIEWER:

It's getting very complicated, so let's go back to a simple thing, that, your father had a meeting with Sinclair, Sinclair indicated that he may withdraw, if you consider the proposal your father gave him, and then he heard back from Sinclair.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

Yes, eventually he heard back Sinclair—

INTERVIEWER:

I want you to start from the beginning.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

You mean the meeting.

INTERVIEWER:

Yes.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

All right. My father, Raymond Haight, met with Sinclair in Sacramento for an hour. The two were very cordial. They discussed the fact that Sinclair was falling in the polls, the fact that neither of them, if they both stayed in, could defeat Frank Merriam, and Sinclair finished by saying that he would get back to my father, and give him an answer as to whether he would withdraw. Later,  [ gap: ;reason: unintelligible ] , he indicated that he would not withdraw, and my experience personally—

INTERVIEWER:

I want to stop, for a sec.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

OK.

[production discussion]

[slate marker visible on screen]
RAYMOND HAIGHT:

My, my father, Raymond Haight, made it very clear to Sinclair that neither of them could win if both of them were in the race, and he asked Upton Sinclair to withdraw. Sinclair, after a meeting of an hour, said he'd get back to him. He got back to him, and he told that he was going to withdraw, was not going to withdraw.

INTERVIEWER:

OK, start again.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

Yeah. When Upton Sinclair got back to him, he said he was not going to withdraw, that his constituents would not let him withdraw, and they were both in it to the end.

INTERVIEWER:

OK, could we stop?

[production discussion]