Interview with Raymond Haight
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QUESTION 1
INTERVIEWER:

—impacted upon your father, and how that, how he changed, because of the Depression.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

Well, he was such a—

INTERVIEWER:

 [ gap: ;reason: unintelligible ] , start again, "My father—"

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

My father, Raymond Haight, should I say Raymond Haight?

INTERVIEWER:

You can refer to him as Raymond Haight, or you can refer to him as your father.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

All right.

[telephone rings] [cut] [slate marker visible on screen]
RAYMOND HAIGHT:

—refer to the Depression in the first sentence, a little bit?

INTERVIEWER:

I didn't even let you finish your first sentence, so no.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

[laughs] OK.

INTERVIEWER:

Yeah, you can say that "my father", you know, "the Depression caused a change in my father," or whatever.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

OK. All right. The Depression caused a change in my father that was so dramatic, that I'll just, when I look back, it was a total, a total turnaround. He'd been a corporation, conservative lawyer for twentyyears, he, whoops, stop it, he wasn't a conservative lawyer for twentyyears, he was only a conservative lawyer for about—

INTERVIEWER:

No, just keep going.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

OK.

INTERVIEWER:

Start from the beginning, though.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

OK. My father was a, should I start with my dad was changed by the Depression?

INTERVIEWER:

Yes, start from the beginning.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

He—

INTERVIEWER:

Wait, I talked when you talked, so, OK, start.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

INTERVIEWER:

OK. My dad was changed dramatically by the Depression. He had been a conservative corporation lawyer, a Republican, his politics were capitalism, and then 1929 came, and he was really just destroyed. Years later, I found that he had read Norman Thomas, and Henry, Henry George, and 50 to a 100 other economists, and that in 1932 he voted for Norman Thomas, so he voted for the Socialist Party, and so he had gone from being a confirmed capitalistic conservative lawyer, to a very left-wing socialist, not Democrat, but really a socialist, had gone all the way.