Interview with Raymond Haight
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QUESTION 4
INTERVIEWER:

I want to ask you, you referred to him the other day, as—

[production discussion]

[slate marker visible on screen]
INTERVIEWER:

OK. That he felt that only, that he was going to run because he felt that only he could do this.

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

Dad did feel, he was a kind of a Don Quixote figure, that has a kind of Haight family history. My grandfather, shortly before he died, called me into the room and told me Haights were responsible for California, and for their future, and so forth. I realized that this grandfather of mine, Dad's dad, did the same thing with Dad, made him feel like he had responsibilities, and that he could do them, that in 1867 Henry H. Haight had been a compromise candidate, had come out of nowhere and been elected governor. I know that Dad felt that that part of history might happen with him. One of the things that is so intriguing is, did he think he had a chance? There's no question in my mind, but that he thought he had a chance, and not, I don't think he would have run, if he didn't think he did.

INTERVIEWER:

Again, I need you to tell me who your referring to, when you say "he".

RAYMOND HAIGHT:

OK. Dad, I'm sure Dad felt that he had a chance. I don't think Dad would have run, if he didn't think that he had a chance. But he was a Don Quixote figure, because he was, still, he had never run for office, any office he had held had been an appointed office. He was very naive, but somehow he thought he was going to go in there without all the money-strings. Dad felt he could turn the state around, take care of the Depression, and save the state, and so forth.