Interview with Evelyn Smith Munro
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QUESTION 9
SUSAN J. LEVENE:

Shortly after you arrived—I guess the strike ended shortly before you arrived in Memphis—and you talked about the enthusiasm and the growth in the union. Can you tell me about that?

EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

Well I used to get letters. I went primarily to be the office secretary and set things up and help, but I became many other things, including the sort of head of the Women's Auxiliary Organization. So I got a lot of letters, both from women in the field and from men. Some of those were on record in various libraries, but there was obviously a great surge of enthusiasm and our conventions were very large. I remember Cotton Plan, Arkansas we filled a church. There must have been several hundred people there. The same thing was true at a convention in Oklahoma. So it, we had a lot of members.

SUSAN J. LEVENE:

What kinds of things did the sharecroppers write you?

EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

Sorry?

SUSAN J. LEVENE:

We ran out of film.

[cut]