Interview with Evelyn Smith Munro
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QUESTION 1
CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

Take one up.

[slate marker visible on screen]
EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

One of my most vivid memories of those days—

SUSAN J. LEVENE:

Can you just start it over?

EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

OK, sure. One of my most vivid memories of those days in the Southern Tenant Farmers Union began, it started really, very early, and was quite important in every possible way. I'd only been there perhaps a week when Mitchell said, "Now we're going to go out into the countryside and I want you to meet some people who are very active in the Union, Uncle Charlie McCoy." And so I was looking forward to it. I was a city girl and I didn't know a lot about the country. We arrived at a pleasant little cabin type place with a tree in the yard and a picnic table, and I sat down to the table for a noon meal with black and white sharecroppers. And I had never so much as shaken hands with a black person, much less had a meal with them. First, I must admit my first thought was, "Oh, what would Mother say if she could see me now?" And then I realized, then, as I think this was part of the whole reason I was there, because the racism that existed in my home town, New Orleans, had just never made it with me. I seemed to have been born without it, so this was just wonderful, one of the great things that happened to me.