Interview with Evelyn Smith Munro
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QUESTION 6
SUSAN J. LEVENE:

That was wonderful. Can you tell me the story of Frank Weem's disappearance during the cropper strike in 1936?

EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

Well I don't know a great deal about it. I spent most of my time in the office during those days, but of course we all knew about it because he was reported as having disappeared.

SUSAN J. LEVENE:

Can you say who it is?

EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

Frank Weems, yeah. Frank Weems was reported as having disappeared. However, shall I go on now?

SUSAN J. LEVENE:

Yes. I'm sorry.

EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

OK, all right. We, you know, went through all the usual routines of asking when he was seen last and what had happened, and it seemed certain that he must have been killed. People had been before, and perhaps his body was in the bayou. And that was the belief, actually, for some time. Much later—I guess a year or so later—I went with Mitchell to Illinois, actually, because we had heard that possibly he was still alive, but we didn't find him, whether that was so or not. But certainly it was a very emotional period.