Interview with Evelyn Smith Munro
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QUESTION 8
SUSAN J. LEVENE:

Can you talk about how the union went about trying to get national attention and the success that you had in that?

EVELYN SMITH MUNRO:

Well one of the reasons, I think, that the nation sort of focused on our union at that period—part of the period—was because Mitchell particularly was an extremely capable publicist. He really knew how to write letters. He knew how to reach people, and we had become—after some of the incidents that had been publicized and some of the visit our people had made to Washington and to New York—we'd really become the live laboratory where you could learn what it was like to be a poor sharecropper or a poor southerner, and many people came to visit and went back with stories that, "Yes, it's true. These are people who are living in abject poverty but are struggling to get out of it."